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Berglund, Carl Johan, Teologie doktorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2203-7977
Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Berglund, C. J. (2019). Discerning Quotations from Heracleon in Origen’s Commentary on the Gospel of John. In: Brouria Bitton-Ashkelony et al (Ed.), Brouria Bitton-Ashkelony et al (Ed.), Origeniana Duodecima: . Paper presented at The 12th International Origen Congress, Jerusalem, 25-29 June, 2017 (pp. 489-503). Leuven: Peeters Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discerning Quotations from Heracleon in Origen’s Commentary on the Gospel of John
2019 (English)In: Origeniana Duodecima / [ed] Brouria Bitton-Ashkelony et al, Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2019, p. 489-503Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2019
Series
BETL ; 302
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Biblical Studies, New testament; Church History; Eastern Christian Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-760 (URN)978-90-429-3947-9 (ISBN)
Conference
The 12th International Origen Congress, Jerusalem, 25-29 June, 2017
Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). Discipleship Ideals in the Acts of Philip. In: : . Paper presented at The Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles in Late Antiquity: Tradition and Innovation” in Regensburg, Germany.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discipleship Ideals in the Acts of Philip
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Biblical Studies, New testament
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-864 (URN)
Conference
The Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles in Late Antiquity: Tradition and Innovation” in Regensburg, Germany
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). Discipleship Ideals in the Apocryphal Acts: A Radical Departure from the Gospels?. In: : . Paper presented at Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) Annual Meeting in San Diego, California.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discipleship Ideals in the Apocryphal Acts: A Radical Departure from the Gospels?
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Biblical Studies, New testament
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-863 (URN)
Conference
Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) Annual Meeting in San Diego, California
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). Heracleon and the Seven Categories of Exegetical Opponents in Origen's Commentary on the Gospel of John. Zeitschrift für antikes Christentum, 23(2), 228-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heracleon and the Seven Categories of Exegetical Opponents in Origen's Commentary on the Gospel of John
2019 (English)In: Zeitschrift für antikes Christentum, ISSN 0949-9571, E-ISSN 1612-961X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 228-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While the adversaries of Origen of Alexandria traditionally have been described in general terms as either literalists or Gnostics, Peter Martens has recently argued convincingly that Origen repeatedly refers to more specific categories of literalist opponents, whom he criticizes for particular literal interpretations. This paper argues that a similar specificity applies to his supposedly Gnostic opponents. In his Commentary on the Gospel of John, Origen regularly uses designations such as "the heterodox" or "those who bring in the natures" to identify specific categories of exegetical opponents, which he defines by their particular interpretative practices or their adherence to particular teachings. When he responds to various scriptural interpretations, Origen takes care to specify which of at least seven identifiable categories of exegetical opponents he currently opposes. Throughout the commentary, Origen maintains the distinctions between these categories and Heracleon, the individual interpreter he names most frequently, and he never uses Heracleon's words as an example of an interpretation by any of the identifiable categories.

Keywords
Literalists, Monarchians, Docetists, Reincarnationists, Gnostics, Marcionites, Valentinians, Heracleon, Origen of Alexandria
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-820 (URN)10.1515/zac-2019-0013 (DOI)000478688100004 ()
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). How “Valentinian” Was Heracleon’s Reading of the Healing of the Son of a Royal Official?. In: Mikael Tellbe, Tommy Wasserman (Ed.), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity: (pp. 219-239). Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How “Valentinian” Was Heracleon’s Reading of the Healing of the Son of a Royal Official?
2019 (English)In: Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity / [ed] Mikael Tellbe, Tommy Wasserman, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2019, p. 219-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The interpretation of a Johannine healing story by the second-century Christian teacher Heracleon has in previous scholarship been presumed to be determined by “Valentinian” sectarian doctrines; Heracleon has been said to identify the royal official in the story with the Maker (δημιουργός), an inferior divinity who has created the material world, and his son as one of three categories of human beings whose eternal fate are determined by their spiritual, animated, or material inherent nature. This article attempts a novel reading of Heracleon’s interpretation, presuming neither that Heracleon subscribes to the ideas associated to “Valentinian” teachers by heresiological authors, nor that Origen of Alexandria always refers to Heracleon’s comments using verbatim quotations. The article argues that the identification of the royal official with the Maker is inferred by Origen based on heresiological presumptions, and that Heracleon used Synoptic and Pauline parallels to read the story as a metaphor of humanity’s perilous state as afflicted with the disease of sin, and in dire need of salvation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2019
Series
Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2. Reihe, ISSN 0340-9570, E-ISSN 2568-7484 ; 511
Keywords
Heracleon, Valentinus, Origen, Gospel of John, Gnosticism
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Biblical Studies, New testament
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-854 (URN)10.1628/978-3-16-158937-9 (DOI)978-3-16-158936-2 (ISBN)978-3-16-158937-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). How ’Valentinian’ Was Heracleon’s Reading of the Healing of the Son of a Royal Official?. In: Mikael Tellbe and Tommy Wasserman (Ed.), Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity: . Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How ’Valentinian’ Was Heracleon’s Reading of the Healing of the Son of a Royal Official?
2019 (English)In: Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity / [ed] Mikael Tellbe and Tommy Wasserman, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The interpretation of a Johannine healing story by the second-century Christian teacher Heracleon has in previous scholarship been presumed to be determined by “Valentinian” sectarian doctrines; Heracleon has been said to identify the royal official in the story with the Maker (δημιουργός), an inferior divinity who has created the material world, and his son as one of three categories of human beings whose eternal fate are determined by their spiritual, animated, or material inherent nature. This paper attempts a novel reading of Heracleon’s interpretation, presuming neither that Heracleon subscribes to the ideas associated to “Valentinian” teachers by heresiological authors, nor that Origen of Alexandria always refers to Heracleon’s comments using verbatim quotations. The paper argues that the identification of the royal official with the Maker is inferred by Origen based on heresiological presumptions, and that Heracleon used Synoptic and Pauline parallels to read the story as a metaphor of humanity’s perilous state as afflicted with the disease of sin, and in dire need of salvation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2019
Series
WUNT II ; 511
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Biblical Studies, New testament; Church History; Eastern Christian Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-761 (URN)10.1628/978-3-16-158937-9 (DOI)978-3-16-158937-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). Literary Criticism in Early Christianity: How Heracleon and Valentinus Use One Passage to Interpret Another. Journal of early Christian studies (Print), 27(1), 27-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Literary Criticism in Early Christianity: How Heracleon and Valentinus Use One Passage to Interpret Another
2019 (English)In: Journal of early Christian studies (Print), ISSN 1067-6341, E-ISSN 1086-3184, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 27-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Following the lead of ancient heresiologists, modern scholars have all too often viewed Valentinus and Heracleon as representatives of a unified sectarian group whose interpretations of early Christian literature were determined by a shared set of "heretical" views. Arguing that the exegetical methodology of early Christians may be better understood if viewed within the larger context of Greco-Roman literary criticism, this article studies how Valentinus and Heracleon use one passage of early Christian literature to illuminate another, and compares this practice to the principle of Aristarchus, which states that Homer should be clarified from Homer.

National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-829 (URN)10.1353/earl.2019.0001 (DOI)000462584700002 ()
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). Origen’s References to Heracleon: A Quotation-Analytical Study of the Earliest Known Commentary on the Gospel of John. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Department of Theology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Origen’s References to Heracleon: A Quotation-Analytical Study of the Earliest Known Commentary on the Gospel of John
2019 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study of Origen’s references to the second-century author Heracleon addresses two problems in previous research: Scholars have regularly presumed that every statement Origen attributes to Heracleon is equivalent to a verbatim quotation, and that Heracleon’s beliefs conform to those described in heresiological sources. The study develops a method of quotation analysis that uses variations in Origen’s attribution formulas to categorize the almost two hundred references as “verbatim quotations,” “summaries,” “explanatory paraphrases,” or “mere assertions.” The more trustworthy references are used to reconstruct Heracleon’s interpretations within a context given by the literature to which he refers himself, including the Gospel of John, a Synoptic gospel tradition similar to the Gospel of Matthew, a collection of Pauline epistles, and the Preaching of Peter. The views exhibited in Heracleon’s comments are compared to those used by Origen to categorize his exegetical opponents. The study identifies over fifty quotations from Heracleon and seventy summaries of his interpretations, and concludes that the views of the heterodox and “those who bring in the natures” are more likely to be inferred by Origen than expressed by Heracleon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Department of Theology, 2019. p. 397
Keywords
Heracleon, Origen, Fourth Gospel, Gnosticism, Valentinianism, Quotation Analysis, Second Century, Early Christianity
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
New Testament Exegesis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-831 (URN)978-91-506-2761-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2019-06-12, Humanistiska teatern, Engelska parken, Thunbergsvägen 3, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). Rhetorical Capital and the Primary Purpose of First Thessalonians. In: : . Paper presented at Tyndale Fellowship Conference in Cambridge, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rhetorical Capital and the Primary Purpose of First Thessalonians
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Biblical Studies, New testament
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-861 (URN)
Conference
Tyndale Fellowship Conference in Cambridge, UK
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Berglund, C. J. (2019). The Genre(s) of the Gospels: Three Views from the Second Century. In: : . Paper presented at Swedish–Norwegian Research School, Stavanger, Norway.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Genre(s) of the Gospels: Three Views from the Second Century
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-859 (URN)
Conference
Swedish–Norwegian Research School, Stavanger, Norway
Available from: 2020-01-09 Created: 2020-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-16Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2203-7977

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