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Radical Justice Through Injustice: Postcolonial Approaches
University College Stockholm, Department of Human Rights and Democracy. Uppsala universitet, Institutet för Rysslands- och Eurasienstudier.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9231-1620
Uppsala universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8796-7756
2023 (English)In: Theorising Justice: A Primer for Social Scientists / [ed] Johanna Ohlsson & Stephen Przybylinski, Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023, p. 91-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
Sustainable development
SDG 10: Reduce income inequality within and among countries, SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable, SDG 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
Abstract [en]

Postcolonial approaches to justice focus on injustice and on the conditions of possibility for being free from domination. This chapter identifies the contribution of postcolonial theories as being crucially important for theorising justice for the ways in which they seek to create means for peoples previously and currently oppressed to speak for themselves, and to be listened to. As Ohlsson and Mitchell show, by including the voices of women, people of colour, people from the Global South, people from different socioeconomic backgrounds, and so forth, the implicit and sometimes explicit masculinist, White, colonialist and elite foundations of western justice theorising are highlighted, bringing to light the production of past, present and future injustices. Postcolonial theorising, they argue, requires a critical rethinking of our conceptions of justice, their aspects (subject, object, domain, social circumstances, principles) as well as their silences, absences and possible complicity in social structures of domination and oppression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023. p. 91-106
Keywords [en]
Epistemic injustice; Non-domination; North-south; Postcolonialism; Rectificatory justice; The other
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Human Rights
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-2234DOI: 10.51952/9781529232233.ch006ISBN: 9781529232226 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ths-2234DiVA, id: diva2:1835558
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 869327Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2024-02-06 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved

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