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Intergenerational Justice
University College Stockholm, Department of Human Rights and Democracy. Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9231-1620
University College Cork, Department of Sociology & Criminology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5501-1642
2023 (English)In: Theorising Justice: A Primer for Social Scientists / [ed] Johanna Ohlsson & Stephen Przybylinski, Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023, p. 223-239Chapter in book (Refereed)
Sustainable development
SDG 10: Reduce income inequality within and among countries, SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable, SDG 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
Abstract [en]

Centring on responsibility in relation to the temporalities of justice, this chapter examines the distinct qualities of an intergenerational justice approach, as well as noting how it overlaps with other positions (such as climate justice and just transitions). It engages with a variety of issues, such responsibility for the compound effects of cumulative acts of pollution, the non-identity of future beings, as well as prospects for greater youth participation in decision-making. Ohlsson and Skillington highlight the implementation challenges and critique that has been brought forward by intergenerational accounts of justice, where emphasis is placed on actualizing the principles of various international treaties and state constitutions affirming the rights of, or duties owed to future generations, as well as new political and legal opportunities. They conclude by highlighting how an intergenerational justice perspective redefines what has traditionally been thought of as imaginable in justice terms, stretching its boundaries to encompass the ‘not yet’ moment of various democratic potentials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023. p. 223-239
Keywords [en]
Intergenerational justice; Rights of future generations; Time and temporality; Non-identity of future peoples; Trusteeship; Prodecural justice for present and future
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Human Rights
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-2238DOI: 10.51952/9781529232233.ch014ISBN: 9781529232226 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ths-2238DiVA, id: diva2:1835594
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 869327Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved

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