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Radical Justice: Anarchism, Utopian Socialism, Marxism and Critical Theory
Uppsala universitet, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8796-7756
University College Stockholm, Department of Human Rights and Democracy. Uppsala universitet, Institutet för Rysslands- och Eurasienstudier.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9231-1620
2023 (English)In: Theorising Justice: A Primer for Social Scientists / [ed] Johanna Ohlsson & Stephen Przybylinski, Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023, p. 75-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
Sustainable development
SDG 10: Reduce income inequality within and among countries, SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable, SDG 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
Abstract [en]

This chapter surveys anarchist, utopian socialist and Marxist approaches to social justice from their foundation in the 19th century to their elaboration within two influential centres of western Marxist thinking that have proved to be especially influential in the social sciences: the Frankfurt School of Critical Theory and the spatialisation of Marxist thought in the work of David Harvey (among others). As Mitchell and Ohlsson show, radical approaches to justice have been particularly important in encouraging a strong focus on the conditions of injustice. They note that these approaches cohere around the roots of injustice in the social relations of production rather than procedure or distribution. By moving from injustice, which is what ‘actually-existing’ justice looks like on the ground, to questions of just modes and relations of production, coupled with people’s fundamental right to justification, the authors argue that radical theories of justice have profound implications for the social sciences for how they reorient how we conceive of the project of justice theorising and especially the struggle for justice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023. p. 75-90
Keywords [en]
Frankfurt School; Injustice; Marxian justice; Relations of production; Utopian socialism
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Human Rights
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-2231DOI: 10.51952/9781529232233.ch005ISBN: 9781529232226 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ths-2231DiVA, id: diva2:1835603
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 869327Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2024-02-06 Last updated: 2024-02-13Bibliographically approved

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Mitchell, DonOhlsson, Johanna

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