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Applying a Transnational Theory of Justice to the Arctic
University College Stockholm, Department of Human Rights and Democracy. Uppsala universitet, Institutet för Rysslands- och Eurasienstudier.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9231-1620
2023 (English)In: Arctic Justice: Environment, Society and Governance / [ed] Corine Wood-Donnelly & Johanna Ohlsson, Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023, p. 8-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
Sustainable development
SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable, SDG 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts by regulating emissions and promoting developments in renewable energy
Abstract [en]

How does a Forstian theory of transnational justice help us understand regional governance structures of the Arctic, such as the Arctic Council, and how could it contribute to implementing procedural aspects of justice? The purpose of this chapter is to discuss transnational justice for the Arctic, taking into account the regional, indigenous and environmental aspects of this specific region. Based on literature reviews on normative traditions of justice, the account suggested here draws on Critical Theory, primarily the work of Rainer Forst (2001, 2014 and 2020). The suggested framework proposes normative criteria required for a comprehensive theory of Arctic justice. In addition, it also recommends an analytical structure for assessing justice in the Arctic. The guiding principles suggested as the backbone for a theory of Arctic justice are reciprocity, generality, transparency and responsibility. Inherently important in the current structure are also the principle of sovereignty and the ‘all affected’ principle, which are discussed and assessed in this chapter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Bristol University Press , 2023. p. 8-20
Series
Spaces and Practices of Justice
Keywords [en]
governance; representation; transnational justice; Arctic Council; Critical Theory
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Human Rights
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ths:diva-2232DOI: 10.51952/9781529224832.ch001ISBN: 9781529224832 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ths-2232DiVA, id: diva2:1835617
Funder
EU, Horizon Europe, 869327Available from: 2023-09-12 Created: 2024-02-06 Last updated: 2024-03-19Bibliographically approved

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Ohlsson, Johanna

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard
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