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  • 1. Carlsson, Petra
    Foucault, Magritte and negative theology beyond representation2013In: Studia Theologica, ISSN 0039-338X, E-ISSN 1502-7791, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent theological writings on the French philosopher Michel Foucault often mention Foucault in relation to negative theology. This article discusses the negative motion in Foucauldian thinking through Foucault's essay on the Belgian painter René Magritte. On the basis of this discussion, the article sketches a renewed account of negative theology. It is a post-representational account of negative theology in accordance with Foucault's critique of representation, as presented in his Magritte essay.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Petra
    Uppsala universitet.
    Foucault, Velázquez and the place of sacramentality.2015In: Studia Theologica, ISSN 0039-338X, E-ISSN 1502-7791, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 126-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses Michel Foucault's analysis of Diego Velázquez’Las Meninasand suggests that Foucault's analysis introduces an erratic, yet material space for human knowledge after the death of God and man alike. The article introduces the space for thought provided by the Foucault analysis and subsequently relates it to Christian sacramentality of the postmetaphysical tradition with Catholic theologian Louis-Marie Chauvet. Chauvet, the article shows, underlines the materiality and situatedness of knowledge and thought in Christian faith in ways that relate to but also differ from the space Foucault points out in his analysis. With Foucault, the article argues, we may approach a more far reaching materiality that, in turn, may affect our account of sacramentality. The final part of the article, thus initiates an exploration of a material sacramentality in relation to the concrete, yet erratic space for human knowledge introduced by Foucault. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

  • 3.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Standing helpless at the roar and surging of the sea: reading biblical texts in the shadow of the wave2006In: Studia Theologica, ISSN 0039-338X, E-ISSN 1502-7791, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 21-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical questions of theodicy are regularly brought to the fore by large catastrophes, such as the recent tsunami. The present article reviews a number of responses in early Jewish literature, arguing that a traditional paradigm, based on the idea of retribution and clearly exhibited in deuteronomistic history, lies at the bottom of most – if not all – of these. Today, moralizing as well as apocalyptic readings are rendered meaningless by our evolutionary worldview. Catastrophes are often caused by those very properties of nature that have made the evolution of human life and society possible. We thus need a modified understanding of divine purpose and control. From such a perspective, three gospel texts are discussed: the stilling of the storm, the tower of Siloam and part of Jesus’ eschatological discourse. While trust in God's control in view of natural disasters is difficult to expect, some of these texts may be read against traditional paradigms as invitations to co-operation and common responsibility in relieving human suffering. This is part of the evolution of human life that in the end might help us to find moral, future and even divine purpose.

  • 4.
    Wigorts Yngvesson, Susanne
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    “Like sheep for the slaughter”.2016In: Studia Theologica, ISSN 0039-338X, E-ISSN 1502-7791, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 39-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary objective of this article is to investigate how a Lutheran theology supports the soldier’s vocation in war. First, the analysis is made in relation to the concept oflarva Dei, second, in relation to “the pastorate” and “technology of power”. By the interaction, I show how Luther’s theology can be used as a critique towards Foucault and vice versa. Through this narrative method, structures of power and liberation are unveiled. The interaction illuminates their diverse views on secular and non-secular order, as well as an immanent and transcendental order. Luther points towards eternity, while Foucault points towards society and its powers. The main outcome is firstly: faith for Foucault is never an explanation of “reality”, but a result of social relations. For Luther, faith is to experience the world as reality; and secondly:larva Deicreates a possibility to overcome suffering by faith, whereas by Foucault’s immanent structure, suffering is understood as “empty” or “meaningless”. Foucault contributes with an important critique of misusing vocation in war. An area for further research is to continue developing critiques of vocation and power in relation to contemporary soldiers’, terrorists’ and anarchists’ masks, since some are used to protect life and others to protect identities.

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