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  • 1. Karlsson, Andrea
    et al.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Triumf, tröstpris eller öppen praktik?: De mänskliga rättigheternas historia.2012In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 132, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Human Rights.
    1979: a Year of the Child, but Not of Children’s Human Rights2019In: Diplomatica, ISSN 2589-1766, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 202-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the diplomatic contestations over children’s rights in connection to the International Year of the Child (iyc) of 1979. At the time, the Year was celebrated as an outstanding success, an event which helped to heighten social and political awareness of the status of children in both developing and industrialized countries, and which brought to light a plethora of new global issues, including street children, children with disabilities and children in armed conflict. Today, the iyc is frequently reduced to a plotting point in histories charting the rise of an international discourse of children’s rights, a discourse that is intimately linked to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989. This article shows how the concept of children’s rights was of peripheral importance to the overarching purposes of the iyc, which instead revolved around a notion of child welfare as integral to wider projects of social and economic development, either in the form of economic sovereignty or basic needs. The article then revisits the 1978–1979 UN debates on a human rights treaty for children, showing how this project initially garnered minimal support among states, international agencies and non-state actors. The article thus takes issue with teleological accounts that see the iyc primarily as a first step toward the subsequent breakthrough of children’s human rights. It also showcases how historical case studies of UN observances can be fruitful for scholars interested in the clashes and amalgamations of competing concepts and projects at an international level.

  • 3. Lindkvist, Linde
    Religious Freedom and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) is widely considered to be the most influential statement on religious freedom in human history. Religious Freedom and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides a groundbreaking account of its origins and developments, examining the background, key players, and outcomes of Article 18, and setting it within the broader discourse around international religious freedom in the 1940s. Taking issue with standard accounts that see the text of the Universal Declaration as humanity's joint response to the atrocities of World War II, it shows instead how central features of Article 18 were intimately connected to the political projects and visions of particular actors involved in the start-up of the UN Human Rights program. This will be essential reading for anyone grappling with the historical and contemporary meaning of human rights and religious freedom.

  • 4.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Faculty of Theology, Uppsala University.
    Review of Exporting Freedom: Religious Liberty and American Power2016In: Religion and Human Rights: an international journal, ISSN 1871-031X, E-ISSN 1871-0328, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 256-261Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 5. Lindkvist, Linde
    Review of The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History by Samuel Moyn2013In: Journal of Human Rights, ISSN 1475-4835, E-ISSN 1475-4843, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 357-361Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Human Rights.
    When the War Came: The Child Rights Convention and the Conflation of Human Rights and the Laws of War,2019In: The Routledge History of Human Rights / [ed] Jean Quataert, Lora Wildenthal, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) remains the most widely ratified international treaty on human rights. Since its completion in 1989, it has come to be seen as an authoritative statement on the human rights of children. Yet historians of human rights have so far paid little attention to the making of this document. This essay argues that the child rights convention – much like other treaties on the rights of specific groups – is of interest to historians, and not just because it recognized children as subjects of human rights. Many of the convention’s articles also challenged traditional boundaries between human rights and other areas of international law and policy. The essay examines in depth the debates surrounding the child rights convention’s Article 38 on children in armed conflict, a clause that has been widely discussed among human rights and child rights scholars because it failed to offer a strict age limit of 18 years for military recruitment and participation. What is rarely noted, however, is that Article 38 also marked the first time that a human rights treaty made a direct reference to humanitarian law, which in effect threw into question the conventional view that human rights law should not regulate the conduct of warfare. This essay illuminates in new ways the relationship between human rights and international humanitarian law.

  • 7.
    Namli, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Human Rights. Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Human Vulnerability and Vulnerable Rights.: On Children's Rights and Asylum Politics in Sweden.2019In: Unaccompanied Migrant Children: Social, Legal, and Ethical Perspectives / [ed] Hille Haker and Molly Greening, Lexington Books , 2019, p. 121-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vulnerability is a part of human existence, a substantial dimension of what it means to be human. As several scholars have convincingly argued, the concept of vulnerability challenges any attempt to reduce the question of human dignity to a protection of individual autonomy.

    We contribute to the discussion by arguing in favor of a more dialectical understanding of the relation between vulnerability and human rights. We start off with a short presentation of our view of the Swedish case of medical age assessments. In the next step we formulate what appears to be a paradox—the Swedish state incorporating the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and, simultaneously, enforcing inhumane restrictions on the rights of young asylum seekers. We proceed by deconstructing the paradox and arguing that these seemingly conflicting trends can be explained as manifestations of two different but interrelated dimensions of the current human rights culture, namely, juridification of human rights protection and reduction of vulnerability to a function of age. In the concluding part of the chapter we offer a critical reflection on the relation between authentic human rights protection and human vulnerability.

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