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  • 1. Karlsson, Andrea
    et al.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Triumf, tröstpris eller öppen praktik?: De mänskliga rättigheternas historia.2012In: Historisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, E-ISSN 2002-4827, Vol. 132, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Human Rights and Democracy, Department of Human Rights and Democracy.
    1979: a Year of the Child, but Not of Children’s Human Rights2019In: Diplomatica, ISSN 2589-1766, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 202-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the diplomatic contestations over children’s rights in connection to the International Year of the Child (iyc) of 1979. At the time, the Year was celebrated as an outstanding success, an event which helped to heighten social and political awareness of the status of children in both developing and industrialized countries, and which brought to light a plethora of new global issues, including street children, children with disabilities and children in armed conflict. Today, the iyc is frequently reduced to a plotting point in histories charting the rise of an international discourse of children’s rights, a discourse that is intimately linked to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989. This article shows how the concept of children’s rights was of peripheral importance to the overarching purposes of the iyc, which instead revolved around a notion of child welfare as integral to wider projects of social and economic development, either in the form of economic sovereignty or basic needs. The article then revisits the 1978–1979 UN debates on a human rights treaty for children, showing how this project initially garnered minimal support among states, international agencies and non-state actors. The article thus takes issue with teleological accounts that see the iyc primarily as a first step toward the subsequent breakthrough of children’s human rights. It also showcases how historical case studies of UN observances can be fruitful for scholars interested in the clashes and amalgamations of competing concepts and projects at an international level.

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  • 3.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Lunds universitet.
    Drömmen om en opolitisk politik2015In: Respons : recensionstidskrift för humaniora & samhällsvetenskap, ISSN 2001-2292, Vol. 4Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 4.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Human Rights and Democracy, Department of Human Rights and Democracy.
    Fördömande och förverkligande: Om förväntningarna på FN:s råd för mänskliga rättigheter2018In: Mänskliga rättigheter i samhället / [ed] Malin Arvidsson, Lena Halldenius, Lina Sturfelt, Malmö: Bokbox Förlag, 2018, p. 253-272Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det här kapitlet fokuserar på FN:s råd för mänskliga rättigheter (MR-rådet). Mer specifikt handlar det om vilka förväntningar som är rimliga att ställa på internationella politiska organ för främjande av mänskliga rättigheter. Efter en analys av den kritik som riktats mot MR-rådet från olika människorättsorganisationer, lyfter kapitlet en rad övergripande frågor om hur internationella organisationer kan arbeta för den faktiska efterlevnaden av mänskliga rättigheter. MR-rådet har precis som sin föregångare (FN:s kommission för mänskliga rättigheter) kritiserats för sin “politisering” av människorättsfrågor samt för sin selektiva användning av fördömande resolutioner. Som kapitlet visar bottnar den här kritiken i föreställningar om att mänskliga rättigheter i grund och botten skulle vara “opolitiska” frågor, samt att kritiska uttalanden från internationella organisationer är viktiga steg mot ökad efterlevnad. Kapitlet avslutas med att plädera för att det stora värdet med FN:s arbete med mänskliga rättigheter består i att förse individer och lokala rörelser med ett brokigt normativt ramverk, som i många fall visat sig vara ett gångbart redskap för att utmana sociala och politiska orättvisor. Att det internationella systemet för mänskliga rättigheter inte “fungerar” är därför inget direkt hot mot mänskliga rättigheter som redskap för politisk förändring.

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  • 5.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Human Rights and Democracy, Department of Human Rights and Democracy.
    Människovärdets slutna och öppna rum: Två historiska röster om FN:s allmänna förklaring om mänskliga rättigheter (1948)2019In: Dragomanen: Årsskrift utgiven av Svenska Forskningsinstitutet i Istanbul, ISSN 1402-358X, Vol. 21, p. 13-22Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 6.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Uppsala universitet.
    Religious Freedom and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) is widely considered to be the most influential statement on religious freedom in human history. Religious Freedom and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides a groundbreaking account of its origins and developments, examining the background, key players, and outcomes of Article 18, and setting it within the broader discourse around international religious freedom in the 1940s. Taking issue with standard accounts that see the text of the Universal Declaration as humanity's joint response to the atrocities of World War II, it shows instead how central features of Article 18 were intimately connected to the political projects and visions of particular actors involved in the start-up of the UN Human Rights program. This will be essential reading for anyone grappling with the historical and contemporary meaning of human rights and religious freedom.

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    Introduktionskapitel
  • 7. Lindkvist, Linde
    Religious Freedom and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) is widely considered to be the most influential statement on religious freedom in human history. Religious Freedom and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides a groundbreaking account of its origins and developments, examining the background, key players, and outcomes of Article 18, and setting it within the broader discourse around international religious freedom in the 1940s. Taking issue with standard accounts that see the text of the Universal Declaration as humanity's joint response to the atrocities of World War II, it shows instead how central features of Article 18 were intimately connected to the political projects and visions of particular actors involved in the start-up of the UN Human Rights program. This will be essential reading for anyone grappling with the historical and contemporary meaning of human rights and religious freedom.

  • 8.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Faculty of Theology, Uppsala University.
    Review of Exporting Freedom: Religious Liberty and American Power2016In: Religion and Human Rights: an international journal, ISSN 1871-031X, E-ISSN 1871-0328, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 256-261Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 9. Lindkvist, Linde
    Review of The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History by Samuel Moyn2013In: Journal of Human Rights, ISSN 1475-4835, E-ISSN 1475-4843, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 357-361Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Rights for the World's Children: Rädda Barnen and the Making of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child2018In: Nordic Journal of Human Rights, ISSN 1891-8131, E-ISSN 1891-814X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 287-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) from 1989 remains the most widely ratified treaty on human rights and functions as a normative frame for myriads of actors working to promote the rights of children. The scholarship on the convention recognises that non-governmental organisations were crucial to the drafting of the treaty. Some of these accounts also single out the Swedish Save the Children Federation (Radda Barnen) as significant for facilitating non-governmental cooperation and shaping the drafting group discussions. Drawing on archival and published first-hand sources, the paper adds to the available accounts, first by outlining some of the developments that led Radda Barnen to embrace the concept of children's rights in the 1970s and become involved in drafting of UNCRC in the 1980s. The paper then reveals how the organisation engaged creatively with the concept of children's rights in the drafting process and succeeded in framing children in armed conflict and female genital mutilation as rights issues, effectively challenging some of the conventional boundaries of international human rights law. But the paper also points to the limits of Radda Barnen's influence and suggests that its creative engagement took place within a relatively conventional framework of child protection.

  • 11.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Human Rights and Democracy, Department of Human Rights and Democracy.
    The Child Subject of Human Rights2020In: The Subject of Human Rights / [ed] Danielle Celermajer, Alexandre Lefebvre, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2020, p. 211-227Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Human Rights and Democracy, Department of Human Rights and Democracy.
    When the War Came: The Child Rights Convention and the Conflation of Human Rights and the Laws of War2019In: The Routledge History of Human Rights / [ed] Jean Quataert, Lora Wildenthal, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) remains the most widely ratified international treaty on human rights. Since its completion in 1989, it has come to be seen as an authoritative statement on the human rights of children. Yet historians of human rights have so far paid little attention to the making of this document. This essay argues that the child rights convention – much like other treaties on the rights of specific groups – is of interest to historians, and not just because it recognized children as subjects of human rights. Many of the convention’s articles also challenged traditional boundaries between human rights and other areas of international law and policy. The essay examines in depth the debates surrounding the child rights convention’s Article 38 on children in armed conflict, a clause that has been widely discussed among human rights and child rights scholars because it failed to offer a strict age limit of 18 years for military recruitment and participation. What is rarely noted, however, is that Article 38 also marked the first time that a human rights treaty made a direct reference to humanitarian law, which in effect threw into question the conventional view that human rights law should not regulate the conduct of warfare. This essay illuminates in new ways the relationship between human rights and international humanitarian law.

  • 13.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    et al.
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Human Rights and Democracy, Department of Human Rights and Democracy.
    Ljungberg, Johannes
    Lunds universitet.
    Samvete i Sverige: om frihet och lydnad från medeltiden till idag2021Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi lever i en tid då tankar om samvete och samvetsfrihet syns allt oftare i svensk offentlighet i rikspolitiken, på tidningarnas ledarsidor och i sociala medier. Historiskt sett har de båda begreppen använts för att markera en viss mån av frihet eller en skyddad position i moraliska, politiska och rättsliga konflikter.

    Hänvisningar till en enskild människas samvete och skillnader mellan en inre och en yttre domstol har kunnat legitimera befrielse från religiösa och statliga tvångsmekanismer och motiverat exempelvis vapen- eller abortvägran.

    En grupp forskare i historia, mänskliga rättigheter, rätts-vetenskap, etik och religionssociologi tar här ett gemensamt grepp om några av de mest brännande konflikterna kring samvete och samvetsfrihet i Sverige från medeltiden till idag. Fram träder en bild av komplexa och motspänstiga begrepp som även idag bär påtagliga spår av äldre distinktioner och historiska konfliktsammanhang. 

  • 14.
    Namli, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Human Vulnerability and Vulnerable Rights.: On Children's Rights and Asylum Politics in Sweden.2019In: Unaccompanied Migrant Children: Social, Legal, and Ethical Perspectives / [ed] Hille Haker and Molly Greening, Lexington Books , 2019, p. 121-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vulnerability is a part of human existence, a substantial dimension of what it means to be human. As several scholars have convincingly argued, the concept of vulnerability challenges any attempt to reduce the question of human dignity to a protection of individual autonomy.

    We contribute to the discussion by arguing in favor of a more dialectical understanding of the relation between vulnerability and human rights. We start off with a short presentation of our view of the Swedish case of medical age assessments. In the next step we formulate what appears to be a paradox—the Swedish state incorporating the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and, simultaneously, enforcing inhumane restrictions on the rights of young asylum seekers. We proceed by deconstructing the paradox and arguing that these seemingly conflicting trends can be explained as manifestations of two different but interrelated dimensions of the current human rights culture, namely, juridification of human rights protection and reduction of vulnerability to a function of age. In the concluding part of the chapter we offer a critical reflection on the relation between authentic human rights protection and human vulnerability.

  • 15.
    Vik, Hanne Hagtvedt
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Dept Archaeol Conservat & Hist, Oslo, Norway.
    Jensen, Steven L. B.
    Danish Inst Human Rights, Copenhagen K, Denmark.
    Lindkvist, Linde
    Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Strang, Johan
    Univ Helsinki, Ctr Nord Studies, Helsinki, Finland.
    Histories of Human Rights in the Nordic Countries2018In: Nordic Journal of Human Rights, ISSN 1891-8131, E-ISSN 1891-814X, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 189-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do the Nordics warrant the label 'global good Samaritans' in human rights promotion? Is the Nordic welfare state a close to perfect realisation of human rights norms? Alternatively, do Nordic international and domestic human rights policies constitute a peculiar 'Nordic human rights paradox' where norms are supported internationally while not being implemented at home? In what is the first collection of articles on Nordic human rights history, we take issue with previous scholarship, finding it often to be unsubstantiated and lacking a basis in historical contexts and relevant source materials. This also includes the stream of historical studies in the past decade, where, until recently, the Nordic countries have represented something of a blind spot. However, the lack of prior interest in the region means there are several promising avenues for historical investigations of both the Nordic countries in human rights history and the role of human rights in the history of the region.

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