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  • 1.
    Camnerin, Sofia
    et al.
    Svenska Missionskyrkan.
    Kazen, ThomasStockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Byggstenar för gudstjänst: idéer och material för gudstjänstförnyelse2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    4Q274 fragment 1 revisited: or who touched whom? further evidence for ideas of graded impurity and graded purifications2010In: Dead Sea Discoveries, ISSN 0929-0761, E-ISSN 1568-5179, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 53-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Kazen, Thomas
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    A Perhaps Less Halakic Jesus and Purity: On Prophetic Criticism, Halakic Innovation, and Rabbinic Anachronism2016In: Journal For The Study of the Historical Jesus, ISSN 1476-8690, E-ISSN 1745-5197, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 120-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purity practices during the first century ce were widespread in Judaea and Galilee as part of everyday life and not limited to concerns relating to the temple cult. Developments in key water rites were partly triggered by concepts of graded impurity, to which an understanding of defilement via food also belonged. Certain rabbinic characteristics represent later developments and cannot be assumed for the time of Jesus. Hand impurity did not originate as a rabbinic decree to protect tĕrûmâ, and accusations against Pharisees for setting aside Scripture in favour of their own traditions did not originate with the historical Jesus, but suggest later polemics. Jesus’ stance on purity is perhaps better characterized as prophetic than halakic.

  • 4.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Concern, custom and common sense: discharge, hand washing and graded purification2015In: Journal For The Study of the Historical Jesus, ISSN 1476-8690, E-ISSN 1745-5197, Vol. 13, no 2-3, p. 150-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay interacts with E.P. Sanders’s work on purity, building on some of his insights, while disagreeing on other points. Sanders’s appeal to historical imagination and common sense is discussed and problematized. The essay deals at length with issues such as the expulsion, isolation, and integration of various impurity bearers, and the emergence of additional water rites to mitigate impurities and prevent unnecessary contamination. The evidence under discussion includes Hebrew Bible, Dead Sea texts, Philo, Josephus, New Testament, and rabbinic literature.

  • 5.
    Kazen, Thomas
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Emotional Ethics in Biblical Texts: Cultural Construction and Biological Bases of Morality2017In: Hebrew Bible and Ancient Israel, ISSN 2192-2276, E-ISSN 2192-2284, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 431-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the evolution of human beings as a successful social species, emotions have played a crucial role. This article focuses on the role of empathy for moral discernment, and especially on its role for an expanding altruism. Although a cultural construct, morality rests on emotional underpinnings which have ensured the survival of humankind. Some of these mechanisms are illustrated by a discussion of select biblical and Second Temple period Jewish texts, including texts from the Covenant Code, Deuteronomy, the Holiness Code, Proverbs, Genesis, and ben Sira. Special attention is given to definitions of altruism, the role of kin, and potentials for expanding empathy beyond assumed limits.

  • 6.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Emotions in Biblical Law: A Cognitive Science Approach2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study pioneers the use of insights from cognitive sciences, such as evolutionary biology, neuroscience, and developmental psychology, as heuristic tools for interpreting ancient texts. The approach could be described as ‘psycho-biological’. The focus is on emotions in the various Pentateuchal legal collections. Kazen discusses the role of disgust, empathy, fear, and a sense of justice, for particular moral and ritual issues: purity and holiness; humanitarian concern for vulnerable categories; ethnocentrism and xenophobia; divine punishment and demonic threat; revenge, compensation, and ransom (kofer), together with removal (kipper) rites.

     The book consists of two main parts, framed by an introductory chapter and a concluding discussion. In the first part, Kazen explores cognitive foundations, including biological and neuroscientific underpinnings for basic affects, and the role of culture in shaping both conventional morality and ritual behaviour. Four particular emotions are then outlined. In the second part, these insights from cognitive science are applied in analyses of particular texts. After an overview of the Pentateuchal legal collections, each of the four emotions is dealt with in a separate chapter. Kazen continuously relates a cognitive science approach to more traditional source and redaction critical analysis, regarding them as complementary.

     As a result, the Pentateuchal legal collections are seen as emotional texts, expressing strong affects ­–  which influences our understanding of the character of Israelite ‘law’. Kazen suggests that interaction and conflict between various emotions can explain discrepancies and tensions between humanitarian concerns and ethnocentrism, and between empathy and justice. He also demonstrates that viewing emotions as common denominators contains a potential for solving some difficult and long-standing conundrums. He argues that a focus on the human embodied experience rather than on theological convictions and theoretical ideas may avoid some interpretative dead ends and open up new avenues for understanding ancient texts.

  • 7.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Evolution, emotion and exegesis: disgust and empathy in Biblical texts on moral and ritual issues2009In: Linnaeus and homo religiosus: biological roots of religious awareness and human identity / [ed] Carl Reinhold Bråkenhielm, 2009, p. 191-218Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Explaining discrepancies in the purity laws on discharges2007In: Revue biblique (1946), ISSN 0035-0907, Vol. 114, no 3, p. 348-371Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Issues of Impurity in Early Judaism2010Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this volume of collected articles and papers on impurity and purification in early Judaism, Kazen focuses primarily on questions of the impurity of discharges and the practice of hand-washing before meals. Kazen uses both literary and historical methods, as well as approaches based on cognitive science; the analysis covers texts from the Pentateuch, Qumran, the New Testament, and some Jewish Hellenistic authors.

    Some chapters are based on unpublished papers, and others have been recently published in various journals; two are based on material and arguments similar to a couple of forthcoming articles for volumes that will not always be easily found by potential readers. Several of the essays relate to or complement each other, thus making this collection very convenient for the reader interested in the topic.

  • 10.
    Kazen, Thomas
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology. Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Jesus and Purity Halakhah: Was Jesus Indifferent to Impurity?2010 (ed. 2)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What did Jesus think about Jewish practice regarding impurity? How did he relate to the inner-Jewish debates of his day concerning ritual purity and impurity? Did he discard the impurity concept altogether, or was it an obvious and natural part of his Jewish faith and life? Did he advocate another or different type of purity?

    Ritual or cultic purity was paramount in Jewish society and life during the Second Temple period, and differences in purity halakhah were one of the factors that distinguished various movements. Therefore, considering purity is crucial in any attempt to interpret the historical Jesus within his contemporary context. In keeping with this goal, Thomas Kazen discusses the historical Jesus alongside what we know of Jewish purity halakhah of his time and explains Jesus’ attitude toward impurity. Kazen balances the work of New Testament scholars on Judaism and legal matters by incorporating the historical Jesus studies of Jewish scholars, seeking to engage students of the historical Jesus with the primary materials relating to legal matters.

  • 11.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Uppsala universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Jesus and Purity Halakhah: Was Jesus Indifferent to Impurity?2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At the end of the Second Temple period, ritual purity came to play an increasing role in Jewish society. Purity laws were interpreted and expanded, and sources of impurity were generally avoided by many. Signs of that development are discussed in this study and put forward as arguments for an expansionist trend, gaining in influence and support from the common people.

    Jesus’ attitude to impurity is traced against this historical background. The (in)famous history of historical Jesus-research necessitates a conscious choice of method. The traditional focus on sayings material and criteria of authenticity is modified; narrative traditions with implicit purity issues are appealed to, and extra-canonical traditions are included. The main areas examined are the most important "fathers" of impurity: "leprosy" (skin diseases), genital discharges and corpse-contamination.

    Jesus is found to have acted in ways easily understood as indifference to these types of impurity. His behaviour is shown on several points to clash with current purity halakhah and dominant expansionist ideals. In an attempt to interpret his actions within the Jewish context and culture of the Second Temple period, three explanatory models are provided. Jesus’ attitude is seen as part of a moral trajectory in Judaism. It is understood as a response to a regional, Galilean dilemma. It is viewed in a power perspective as an expression of Jesus’ eschatological struggle against demonic evil.

    The result is that Jesus may be understood as operating within the purity paradigm of his time, yet pushing it to the breaking point, at least in the eyes of some. Such a reconstruction makes subsequent developments intelligible, in which various Christian currents drew conflicting conclusions. The function and effect of purity laws change with time, however. While they are irrelevant to most modern people, those looking to Jesus’ behaviour for some sort of guidance may find contemporary analogies.

  • 12.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Jesus and the zavah: implications for interpreting Mark2013In: Purity, holiness, and identity in Judaism and Christianity: essays in memory of Susan Haber / [ed] Carl S. Ehrlich, Anders Runesson and Eileen Schuller, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2013, p. 112-143Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Jesus, Scripture and paradosis: response to Friedrich Avemarie2010In: The New Testament and Rabbinic Literature / [ed] Reimund Bieringer, Florentino García Martínez, Didier Pollefeyt and Peter Tomson, Leiden : Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2010, p. 281-288Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kazen, Thomas
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Levels of Explanation for Ideas of Impurity: Why Structuralist and Symbolic Models Often Fail While Evolutionary and Cognitive Models Succeed2018In: Journal of Ancient Judaism, ISSN 1869-3296, E-ISSN 2196-7954, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 75-100Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Moralische Emotionen in der Jesusüberlieferung: ein psycho-biologischer Beitrag zum Verhältnis von Selbsterhaltung und Nächstenorientierung2011In: Evangelische Theologie, ISSN 0014-3502, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 288-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Die urchristliche Ethik scheint mit ihren radikalen Forderungen den Menschen zu überfordern und gilt deshalb oft als Widerspruch zur Natur des Menschen. Diese Spannung wird durch moderne soziobiologische Thesen vom »egoistischen Gen« noch erhöht. Der Aufsatz zeigt: Viele naturwissenschaftliche Befunde sprechen für einen kooperativen Charakter nicht nur unserer Gene, sondern auch des Verhaltens höher entwickelter sozialer Tiere wie der Primaten. Menschliches und urchristliches Ethos können daran anknüpfen. Der Aufsatz weist nach, dass wir im Bild des barmherzigen Jesus im MkEv wie in der Ethik der Feindesliebe und des Gewaltverzicht in der Logienquelle eine Balance zwischen Selbsterhaltung und Nächstenorientierung finden. Auch die radikal altruistischen Gebote zur Vergebungsbereitschaft sind nicht gegen die Natur des Menschen gerichtet, sondern Weiterführung eines psycho-biologischen Erbes, ohne dass damit einer naturalistischen Begründung der Ethik das Wort geredet wird.

  • 16.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Purity and Persia2015In: Current issues in priestly and related literature: the legacy of Jacob Milgrom and beyond, Atlanta: SBL Press, 2015, p. 435-462Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Response to Larry Hurtado: To live and die for Jesus2005In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 70, p. 333-338Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Response to Stephen Finlan2013In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 78, p. 87-92Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Revelation, interpretation, tradition: Jesus, authority and halakic development2014In: The identity of Jesus: Nordic voices / [ed] Samuel Byrskog, Tom Holmén and Matti Kankaanniemi., Tübingen, 2014, p. 127-160Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Balberg, Mira. Purity, body, and self in early rabbinic literature.2015In: History of Religions, ISSN 0018-2710, E-ISSN 1545-6935, Vol. 55, no 2, p. 231-235Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Kazen, Thomas
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Boyarin, Daniel. The Jewish Gospels: the story of the Jewish Christ.2016In: The Catholic Biblical Quarterly, ISSN 0008-7912, E-ISSN 2163-2529, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 768-771Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Dunn, James D G. Jesus, Paul, and the Gospels.2013In: The Catholic Biblical Quarterly, ISSN 0008-7912, E-ISSN 2163-2529, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 353-355Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Fiensy, David A. Jesus the Galilean: soundings in a first century life.2009In: Biblical Theology Bulletin, ISSN 0146-1079, E-ISSN 1945-7596, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 171-172Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Gerhardsson, Birger. Memory and manuscript: Oral tradition and written transmission in rabbinic Judaism and early Christianity [1961] with Tradition and transmission in early Christianity [1964]2004In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 136-138Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Gerhardsson, Birger. The reliability of the gospel tradition2004In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 136-138Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Haber, Susan. They shall purify themselves: essays on purity in early Judaism.2015In: Hebrew Studies, ISSN 0146-4094, Vol. 56, p. 430-433Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Hengel, Martin & Schwemer, Anna Maria. Der messianische Anspruch Jesu und die Anfänge der Christologie2005In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 137-139Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Review of Holmberg, Bengt. Människa och mer: Jesus i forskningens ljus2002In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 78, no 4, p. 189-191Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Scripture, Interpretation, or Authority? : Motives and Arguments in Jesus’ Halakic Conflicts2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study of motives and arguments in Jesus’ halakic conflicts, Thomas Kazen suggests a way out of the present methodological impasse in the use of traditional criteria of authenticity in historical Jesus research, at least when it comes to those Jesus traditions that relate to halakic issues. Kazen employs results from recent research on the development of halakah during the Second Temple period, in particular from Aharon Shemesh’s discussion of two models (developmental and reflective) for explaining halakic development within and between various Jewish movements, and three areas of tension for analyzing dissenting views (revelation vs . interpretation, Scripture vs . tradition, and nominalism vs. realism). Kazen revisits the Synoptic conflict narratives about Sabbath observance, purity rules and divorce practices, and discusses motives and arguments ascribed to Jesus, whether implicitly or explicitly, by the texts themselves, or by modern interpreters. By combining analyses of halakic development with tradition and redaction criticism, Kazen disentangles theological motives from reasonable historical explanations and suggests relative dates and contexts for motives and arguments often ascribed to Jesus. He questions interpretations which focus on unique individual or halakic authority and suggests that the earliest Jesus tradition appeals to the priority of human need and to creational intent, viewing revelation as based on plain reading and a realistic understanding of Scripture. Jesus’ stance is best explained within the framework of prophetic criticism and a traditional Israelite understanding of Torah. With this work the author contributes as much to our understanding of halakic development during the Second Temple and Tannitic periods as he does to our understanding of the historical Jesus and his relationship to contemporary movements.

  • 30.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Sectarian gospels for some Christians?: intention and mirror reading in the light of extra-canonical texts2005In: New Testament Studies, ISSN 0028-6885, E-ISSN 1469-8145, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 561-578Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Smuts, skam, status: Perspektiv på samkönad sexualitet i Bibeln och antiken2018Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Västerlandet har en historia av förtryck och förtal av homosexuella som bygger på en blandning av religiösa och kulturella föreställningar. Men de bibliska texter som fördömer samkönade sexuella handlingar är få och knappast begripliga utan grundläggande kunskap om antika samhällsmönster och föreställningar.

    I Smuts, skam, status. Perspektiv på samkönad sexualitet i Bibeln och antiken granskas ett urval texter från Främre Orienten, Grekland och Rom, utifrån tre tolkningsparadigm: renhet–orenhet, makt och underordning, samt heder och skam. Thomas Kazen, professor i bibelvetenskap vid Teologiska högskolan Stockholm, visar hur en bakomliggande hierarkisk och hedersrelaterad grundsyn kan göra texterna mer begripliga. Han reflekterar också över de stora skillnader – men också likheter – mellan antika och moderna värderingar, som kan anas.

  • 32.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Son of Man and early Christian identity formation2008In: Identity formation in the New Testament / [ed] Bengt Holmberg and Mikael Winninge, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2008, p. 97-122Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Son of man as kingdom imagery: Jesus between corporate symbol and individual redeemer figure2007In: Jesus from Judaism to Christianity: continuum approaches to the historical Jesus / [ed] Tom Holmén, London: T&T Clark, 2007, p. 87-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Standing helpless at the roar and surging of the sea: reading biblical texts in the shadow of the wave2006In: Studia Theologica, ISSN 0039-338X, E-ISSN 1502-7791, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 21-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical questions of theodicy are regularly brought to the fore by large catastrophes, such as the recent tsunami. The present article reviews a number of responses in early Jewish literature, arguing that a traditional paradigm, based on the idea of retribution and clearly exhibited in deuteronomistic history, lies at the bottom of most – if not all – of these. Today, moralizing as well as apocalyptic readings are rendered meaningless by our evolutionary worldview. Catastrophes are often caused by those very properties of nature that have made the evolution of human life and society possible. We thus need a modified understanding of divine purpose and control. From such a perspective, three gospel texts are discussed: the stilling of the storm, the tower of Siloam and part of Jesus’ eschatological discourse. While trust in God's control in view of natural disasters is difficult to expect, some of these texts may be read against traditional paradigms as invitations to co-operation and common responsibility in relieving human suffering. This is part of the evolution of human life that in the end might help us to find moral, future and even divine purpose.

  • 35.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    The christology of early Christian practice2008In: Journal of Biblical Literature, ISSN 0021-9231, E-ISSN 1934-3876, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 591-614Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    The Good Samaritan and a presumptive corpse2006In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 71, p. 131-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Kazen, Thomas
    Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Theology. University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology.
    Tidiga Jesusbilder: om erfarenheten bakom och framför kristologin2005In: Svensk teologisk kvartalskrift, ISSN 0039-6761, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 49-66Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 37 of 37
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