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  • 51.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    Review of Alexander Kocar, Heavenly Stories: Tiered Salvation in the New Testament and Ancient Christianity (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021)2023In: Journal of early Christian studies (Print), ISSN 1067-6341, E-ISSN 1086-3184, no 1, p. 109-110Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Review of Christoph Markschies, Christian Theology and Its Institutions in the Early Roman Empire: Prolegomena to a History of Early Christian Theology.2017In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 82, p. 282-285Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Review of John R. L. Moxon, Peter’s Halakhic Nightmare: The “Animal” Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective. WUNT II/432. (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2017)2018In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 83, p. 278-281Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Review of Ken Parry (ed.), The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Patristics. Wiley Blackwell Companions to Religion Series. (Chichester: Wiley 2015)2016In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 81, p. 264-265Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Review of Lorne R. Zelyck, John among the Other Gospels: The Reception of the Fourth Gospel in the Extra-Canonical Gospels. WUNT II 347. (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2013)2015In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 80, p. 269-271Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology.
    Review of Matthew D. C. Larsen, Gospels Before the Book (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018)2020In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsskrift, Vol. 85, p. 259-262Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    Review of Nathan L. Shedd, A Dangerous Parting: The Beheading of John the Baptist in Early Christian Memory (Baylor, 2021)2023In: The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, ISSN 0022-0469, E-ISSN 1469-7637, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 401-402Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Review of Peter W. Martens, Origen and Scripture: The Contours of the Exegetical Life. Oxford Early Christian Studies. (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2012)2015In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 80, p. 245-247Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Review of vanThanh Nguyen, Peter and Cornelius: A Story of Conversion and Mission. ASM Monograph Series 15. (Eugene: Pickwick 2012)2014In: Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok, ISSN 1100-2298, Vol. 79, p. 190-191Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Rhetorical Capital and the Primary Purpose of First Thessalonians2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 61. Berglund, Carl Johan
    Söndagen före domssöndagen, den 14 november2010In: Tro och liv, ISSN 0346-2803, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    The Ascetic Subculture of the Acts of Thomas and His Wonderworking Skin2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a fourth- or fifth-century narrative known as the Acts of Thomas and his Wonderworking Skin, Jesus sells the apostle Thomas as a slave to the governor of India. When the governor’s wife converts to Christianity, dumps all her earthly riches outside her front door, and turns celibate, the governor has the apostle tortured and his skin flayed off – but Thomas survives, and uses his peeled-off skin to raise the dead. This paper uses Kathryn Tanner’s concept of culture to compare the ideals advocated by this story – servitude to Christ, voluntary poverty, sexual abstinence, readiness to suffer, and zeal for evangelization – to ideals expressed in first-century Christian literature. The subculture expressed by the narrative is found to consist entirely of ideals also expressed in the New Testament, which are updated, recontextualized, and radicalized in order to reach an audience of fourth- or fifth-century Christians.

  • 63.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    The Ascetic Subculture of the Acts of Thomas and His Wonderworking Skin2024In: Vigiliae christianae (Print), ISSN 0042-6032, E-ISSN 1570-0720, Vol. 78, no 1, p. 8-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a fourth- or fifth-century narrative known as the Acts of Thomas and his Wonderworking Skin, Jesus sells the apostle Thomas as a slave to the governor of India. When the governor’s wife converts to Christianity, dumps all her earthly riches outside her front door, and turns celibate, the governor has the apostle tortured and his skin flayed off, but Thomas survives, and uses his peeled-off skin to raise the dead. This paper uses Kathryn Tanner’s concept of culture to compare the ideals advocated by this story – servitude to Christ, voluntary poverty, sexual abstinence, readiness to suffer, and zeal for evangelization – to ideals expressed in first-century Christian literature. The subculture expressed by the narrative is found to consist entirely of ideals also expressed in the New Testament, which are updated, recontextualized, and radicalized in order to reach an audience of fourth- or fifth-century Christians.

  • 64.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    The Deaths of the Apostles in the Apocryphal Acts2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although far less prominent than the death of Jesus, the passing away of his disciples can arguably be described as some of the most significant events in first-century Christianity, and the way in which they were depicted in ancient literature can tell us how early Christian authors imagined how a Christian should live and die. This paper studies how the apostles’ deaths are depicted in the collections of early Christian stories known as the Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles – stories whose predominantly fictional nature give their authors freedom to depict their protagonist’s de- mise as an ideal Christian death. In comparison to how an ideal death is conceived in Greco-Roman culture in general, and in philosophical biographies in particular, these apocryphal death scenes are found to manifest many of the same ideals – calm, control, and consistency – while adding Christian values such as belief in immediate resurrection and the importance of teaching and evangelizing to your last breath.

  • 65.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology.
    The Exegetical Methodology of Heracleon’s hypomnēmata2021In: Early Christian Commentators of the New Testament: Essays on Their Aims, Methods and Strategies / [ed] Joseph Verheyden & Tobias Nicklas, Leuven: Peeters Publishers, 2021, p. 1-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than a century, there has been a clear scholarly consensus that the guiding principles of the earliest known New Testament commentary, Heracleon’s hypomnēmata on the Gospel of John, are a number of "Gnostic" or "Valentinian"  dogmatic points that Heracleon attempts to read into the Fourth Gospel. After Ansgar Wucherpfennig’s well-received argument that Heracleon is one of the first Christians to apply Greco-Roman literary criticism to a biblical writing , and my own successful attempt at distinguishing more trustworthy references, such as verbatim quotations and non-interpretive summaries, from explanatory paraphrases and mere assertions in Origen’s presentation of Heracleon , it is time to make a new overall assessment of Heracleon’s exegetical methodology.

    This paper argues that Heracleon performs his exegesis of the Johannine gospel in three distinct stages: First, he paraphrases the gospel passage to accentuate the features of the text he finds most relevant to discuss. Then, he analyzes the text in detail, using various methods of Greco-Roman literary criticism including word studies (γλωσσηματικόν), analysis of what is reported in the text (ἱστορικόν), and attention to narrative characters (πρόσωπα). Lastly, he applies the text to a theological theme of potential interest to his audience. Two such themes are apparent form the available material: the history of God’s salvific actions toward humanity, and the process of leading people toward conversion to a Christian faith.

  • 66.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology.
    The Genre(s) of the Gospels: Expectations from the Second Century2020In: Modern and Ancient Literary Criticism of the Gospels: Continuing the Debate on Gospel Genre(s) / [ed] Robert Matthew Calhoun, David P. Moessner, and Tobias Nicklas, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2020, p. 113-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of how the New Testament Gospels interact with ancient genres should not be made solely on the basis of comparisons with other pieces of ancient literature, but also in view of their early reception. The way in which ancient authors reflected on and used materials found in the Gospels may inform us of how they viewed the genre participation of these four early Christian narra- tives. This paper considers the reception of Gospel material in three different second-century writings: §§18–86 of the apocryphal Acts of John, Exhortation to the Greeks by Clement of Alexandria, and Heracleon’s hypomnēmata on the Gospel of John. It argues that the author of the Acts of John expects the Gospels to contain discipleship patterns to be emulated by Christians, that Clement regards them as sources of divine truth, and that Heracleon expects them to be depictions of past events that not only contain Christian teachings of continuous relevance for the Christian movement, but also are symbolically significant in themselves. The variance of these apparent expectations from early readers can be accommodated by viewing the Gospels as participating in multiple genres, including ancient historiography, Christian proclamation, Judeo-Christian pro- phetic writings, and ancient biography.

  • 67.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet.
    The Genre(s) of the Gospels: Three Views from the Second Century2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    The Innovation of a Master Wonderworker in the Character of Simon Peter2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Åbo Akademi.
    The Innovation of a Master Wonder-worker in the Character of Simon Peter2024In: Approaching Religion, E-ISSN 1799-3121, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 99-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simon Peter undergoes a considerable development from the character’s first introduction in the Gospel of Mark to later narratives, where he gains remarkable miraculous abilities. In Mark, he witnesses Jesus performing numerous miracles without himself being named as the performer of a single one, but in Matthew’s Gospel Peter walks on water (Matt 14:22–33), in Acts he heals two paralytics and raises a woman from the dead (Acts 3:1–10; 9:32–42), and in the fourth-century Latin Acts of Peter, also known as Actus Vercellenses, the character makes a dog speak (Acts Pet. 9.9–15), miraculously restores a shattered marble statue (11.8–23), and revives several people from the dead (27.1–11, 28.63–66). This article examines how Peter’s various miracles contribute to their respective stories, analyses how they respond to the needs of their respective authors, and discusses what they tell us about the use of genre in the narrative tradition about the apostle Peter and his miracles.

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  • 70.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    The Philosopher’s Death in Origen’s Exhortation to Martyrdom2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Death by martyrdom constitutes not only the inclusio of Origen’s public life from the martyrdom of his father to his own post-imprisonment death in 254 CE, but also the theme of one of his shorter writings, Exhortation to Martyrdom, where he offers advice to his friends Ambrose and Protoctetus, both of which appear to be awaiting their martyrdom. This paper compares the ideal death envisioned by Origen to death ideals in Greco-Roman culture.

  • 71.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    The Selection of Paradoxographical Material in Apocryphal Acts2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi .
    The Sinful Nation: Isa 1:2–17 in Anti-Jewish Early Christian Interpretation2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology.
    The Sychar Story as a Standard Conversion Narrative in Heracleon’s Hypomnēmata2022In: Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions / [ed] Athanasios Despotis & Hermut Löhr, Leiden: Brill , 2022, p. 427-449Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The second-century literary critic Heracleon has long been thought to interpret the story of Jesus’s encounter with a Samaritan woman at the well of Sychar (John 4:1–42) as a paradigmatic conversion narrative for a particular group of people: those born with a spiritual nature, who therefore are predestined to be saved, and only need to be apprised of this fact. This common view is problematic, since such a deterministic soteriology is unattested in extant quotations from Heracleon’s hypomnēmata, and only appears when Origen of Alexandria (ca. 185–254 CE) brings it in to refute Heracleon’s views. This paper compares Heracleon’s comments, as they can be constructed from Origen’s references, to four modern conceptualizations of ancient religious and philosophical conversion: a recognition of one’s superior nature (Pagels 1973), a deliberate change of perspectives (Nock 1933; MacMullen 1984), a transition of rhetorically expressed loyalty (Crook 2004), and a prolonged social process (Rambo 1993; Brandt 2019; Brandt 2020). It concludes that Heracleon views Christian conversion as a deliberate rejection of Gentile and Jewish worship traditions in favor of a Christian one, preceded by a shorter or longer process of interaction with Christian believers, who act as witnesses and spiritual guides to the potential converts. Thereby, Heracleon’s concept of conversion comprises essential points from several modern conceptualizations of conversion.

  • 74.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology.
    Thecla, the Ideal Christian: Discipleship Ideals from the Second Century to the Fourth2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the beginning of his hagiography of his beloved sister Macrina (the Younger, ca. 330–379), Gregory of Nyssa (ca. 330–395) puts great emphasis on the parallel between Macrina and the second-century literary figure of Thecla, known from the second-century Acts of Paul and Thecla. By doing so, he suggests that the personal qualities of Macrina that he intents to laud in his hagiography are paralleled by Thecla – but what are those? Divided by a gap of two centuries, during which time the Christian movement has developed from a fringe faction into an imperially supported religion, the historical circumstances of the literary figures of Thecla and Macrina are hardly comparable, and the traits demanded by Christians in such differing circumstances could be vastly different. This paper aims to discern the discipleship ideals – personal qualities of an ideal Christian – are presented throughout the narrative of both the Life of Macrina and the Acts of Paul and Thekla, and to discuss whether Gregory’s discipleship ideals are continuous with that of the previous author, or if Gregory distorts the image of Thecla to promote a different set of ideals. 

  • 75.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Åbo Akademi.
    Thekla från Ikonion: Fornkyrkans bortglömda förebild2024In: Hybrid, ISSN 2004-5425, Vol. 2, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakom några av de mest inflytelserika av den tidiga kyrkans fäder och mödrar döljer sig en förebildernas förebild, den idag närmast okända tonårsflickan Thekla från Ikonion (första århundradet e.Kr.), som enligt berättelsen lämnade en bekväm överklasstillvaro för att i Paulus efterföljd sprida evangeliet i Mindre Asien. Den här artikeln analyserar hur Thekla fungerar som förebild för senare generationers kristna, som Gregorios av Nyssa och hans storasyster Makrina (300-talet e.Kr.), och diskuterar hur Theklas berättelse kan fungera förebildligt i en nutida frikyrklig kontext.

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  • 76.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    Three Reasons to Die in Origen’s Exhortation to Martyrdom2024In: Patristica Nordica Annuaria, ISSN 2001-2365, Vol. 38, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his Exhortation to Martyrdom, Origen writes to his friends Ambrose and Protoctetus, both of which seem to be in immediate danger of being executed for their Christian confession and failure to worship the Greco-Roman gods. Instead of advising them on how to avoid death, he encourages them to be happy with their fate, and even to jump for joy over being allowed to suffer for Christ. This paper identifies three important arguments behind the theologian’s stance that martyrdom is to be embraced rather than avoided: (1) passing from earthly life into death is a net gain for Christians; (2) the alternative, denying Christ and sacrificing to the pagan gods, is an act of evil; (3) martyrdom is the only truly worthy ἀντιμισθία (“payback” or “repayment”) that Christian believers can offer their divine patron.

  • 77. Berglund, Carl Johan
    Tre ledtrådar till Gamla testamentet2011In: Sändaren, ISSN 1103-6206Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 78. Berglund, Carl Johan
    Tredje söndagen i advent, den 12 december2010In: Tro och liv, ISSN 0346-2803, no 5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 79. Berglund, Carl Johan
    Trettonde söndagen efter trefaldighet, den 18 september2011In: Tro och liv, ISSN 0346-2803Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 80.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Understanding Origen: The Genre(s) of the Gospels in Light of Ancient Greek Philology and Modern Genre Theory2016In: Scrinium, ISSN 1817-7530, E-ISSN 1817-7565, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 181-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reflections of Origen of Alexandria (ca. 185–254 CE) concerning the nature of the New Testament Gospels may be better understood if viewed in relation to a scheme of standard introductory questions used by ancient Greek philologists in their commentaries on classical Greek literature. While this scheme did not include questions about the form or genre of the writings to be analyzed, Origen repeatedly added such reflections when he adapted the scheme in his commentaries on biblical writings. These reflections inform us of his expectations of the Gospels. Using a modern concept of genre as a system of expectations shared between author and reader, and frequently intended to shape the worldview of the readers, Origen’s views of the nature of the Gospels can be expressed as their simultaneous participation in two genres: Christian teaching and ancient historiography.

  • 81.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology.
    Öppna vyer i 200-talets kristna akademi: Origenes attityd gentemot grekisk filosofi och kristna apokryfer2021In: Öppna vyer – lång sikt: Festskrift till Owe Kennerberg / [ed] Thomas Kazen & Susanne Wigorts Yngvesson, Stockholm: Enskilda Högskolan Stockholm , 2021, p. 175-186Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Origenes från Alexandria (ca. 185–254) förlorade som sjuttonåring sin far till martyrskapet, och själv var han ofta utsatt för påtryckningar både från våldsverkare och myndigheter. Ändå tog han inte avstånd från det hedniska majoritetssamhällets kultur, utan skaffade sig en god grekisk-romersk bildning, försörjde sig på att undervisa i grekiska språket och litteraturen, och lärde sina egna kristna studenter att bygga sina teologiska reflektioner med de bästa verktyg de kunde finna i den grekisk-romerska filosofin. Samma öppenhet för motståndarnas argument finner vi i hans attityd gentemot kristna skrifter som befann sig utanför den framväxande kanongränsen, och ofta torgförde teologier han var främmande för. Ändå tog han dessa texter på allvar, gick i dialog med dem och kunde till och med erkänna när de hade rätt. I jämförelse med många andra tidigkristna författare är det en mycket generös hållning.

  • 82.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    et al.
    University College Stockholm, Stockholm School of Theology, Department of Religious Studies and Theology. Åbo Akademi.
    Crostini, BarbaraNewmaninstitutet.Kelhoffer, James A.Uppsala universitet.
    Why We Sing: Music, Word, and Liturgy in Early Christianity2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a seminal study, Cur cantatur?, Anders Ekenberg examined Carolingian sources for explanations of why the liturgy was sung, rather than spoken. This multidisciplinary volume takes up Ekenberg’s question anew, investigating the interplay of New Testament writings, sacred spaces, biblical interpretation, and reception history of liturgical practices and traditions. Analyses of Greek, Latin, Coptic, Arabic, and Gǝʿǝz sources, as well as of archaeological and epigraphic evidence, illuminate an array of topics, including recent trends in liturgical studies; manuscript variants and liturgical praxis; Ignatius of Antioch’s choral metaphor; baptism in ancient Christian apocrypha; and the significance of late ancient altar veils.

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  • 83.
    Berglund, Carl Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Nya testamentets exegetik.
    Gustafsson, Daniel
    Ad fontes: Festskrift till Olof Andrén på 100-årsdagen2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna bok är en festskrift till prästen, teologen och översättaren Olof Andrén. Bokens titel, Ad fontes, betyder »till källorna« och är vald som ett erkännande av Olof Andréns mångåriga gärning för att uppmärksamma och tillgängliggöra den rikedom som  nns bevarad i skrift från kristendomens äldsta tradition. Hans gärning har sedan länge en stor betydelse för kyrka, akademi och kulturliv i Sverige. Boken inleds med tre bidrag som tecknar Olof Andréns gärning och patristikens uppsving i Sverige under 1900-talet. Därefter följer sjutton artiklar som lyfter fram nya perspektiv på fornkyrkliga text- er och personer, tidigkristen ikonogra  och kyrkomusik, samt på hur arvet från denna tradition kommit att uppfattas och återspeglas i senare tid.

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